Brother From A Diff'rent World
La última cena, dir. Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, 1976

One of my all-time favs

Read below and/or click the link to my review on Bold As Love Magazine

Through A Lens Darkly poster

There’s a feeling that you get from a photograph.

Multiple feelings. These stem from emotional or physical connections to the subject, to the setting, angle, tone, imagination, and even size of the photo. This is regardless of it being from 100 years ago or one day ago, on paper or on a digital screen. Yet, one can imagine that for most people it is how the photo reflects who you are that brings the most distinct feelings. However, when dealing with the African-American and African diaspora, the problem is that the way many of us perceive ourselves is defined by the hegemonic forces of colonialism and post-colonial means of control – done in its strongest negative form through the image.

Combating those negative portrayals is the family album – a piece of home that, if one is fortunate enough to have a keeper of those images, shows you the good and bad of who you are and where you come from, and can even lay groundwork toward the answers you may need about where you need to go in life. My father, I am proud to say, is that keeper of images for my huge family, but for director Thomas Allen Harris it was his maternal grandfather, Albert Sydney Johnson, Jr. who did so and inspired both he and his multi-discipline artist brother Lyle Ashton Harris to understand the power of making and sharing images and the pride that one can develop from doing so.

Who would make visible the invisible?” – Thomas Allen Harris

In his latest documentary, Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People, Harris traces his family legacy once more (as he did in his first two films) to frame how Black photographers wrestle with double-consciousness and the ‘otherness’ of Western life while creating their images, and traces the history behind Black images in history and popular culture to show the troubling ways the Black body has been used as a commodity in American society.

(please click the link to read the rest of the review…)

http://www.boldaslove.us/2014/08/20/review-through-a-lens-darkly-black-photographers-and-the-emergence-of-a-people/

since1938:

brotherfromadiffrentworld:

Great Black TV Moments #30

A Different World - season 02, episode 20: No Means No

Welcome to the newest segment of this blog, Great Black TV Moments!

We start it off on a dramatic note, but one that isn’t really seen much in comedy anymore. While A Different World had a lot of ‘issue’ related episodes, this was the first real stand out one as ‘date rape’ wasn’t something discussed in many circles in the late 1980’s, especially not to a high degree on Black college campuses - or rather not enough. So watch this and feel free to engage in discussion on it.

Freddie Brooks - Cree Summer

Dwayne Wayne - Kadeem Hardison

Garth ‘A-hole’ Parks - Taimak (better known as The Last Dragon's Bruce Leroy)

Look out for the next Great Black TV Moment next Tuesday.

I use this episode (and the one with Gina’s domestic violence) for my Victim Impact class

Great to hear. Definitely both teachable moments.

iwriteaboutfeminism:

#Community

asylum-art:

christopher-ryan mckenney: surreal photography

lovelyandbrown:

anogent:

Someone live-tweeted Mike Brown’s murder. Read Bottom-up.

TW: POLICE BRUTALITY

I know the Brown family asked to not have his image used, but because this was the stream of conscious/presence sense impression of someone who will undoubtedly be a witness in this case, I thought it was important to show the photo and his proximity to what happened.

anotherafrica:

Leonce Raphael Agbodjélou | Demoiselles de Porto-Novo
Existing within the faded walls of a family home at the centre of one city’s complex history, these are the Demoiselles de Porto Novo.
As the title would suggest, the solitary figure within these images are of young women from the port city, and former capital of French Dahomey. Demoiselles de Porto-Novo the portraiture series, is part of a broader body of work and project entitled Citizens of Port-Novo by Beninois photographer Leonce Raphael Agbodjélou.
Discover more. 

SOURCE | ANOTHERAFRICA.NET 
Images courtesy of  Leonce Raphael Agbodjélou and Jack Bell Gallery. All rights reserved.

ANOTHERAFRICA.NET |  TUMBLR |  FACEBOOK  |  TWITTER  |  INSTAGRAM

anotherafrica:

Leonce Raphael Agbodjélou | Demoiselles de Porto-Novo

Existing within the faded walls of a family home at the centre of one city’s complex history, these are the Demoiselles de Porto Novo.

As the title would suggest, the solitary figure within these images are of young women from the port city, and former capital of French Dahomey. Demoiselles de Porto-Novo the portraiture series, is part of a broader body of work and project entitled Citizens of Port-Novo by Beninois photographer Leonce Raphael Agbodjélou.

Discover more.

SOURCE | ANOTHERAFRICA.NET

Images courtesy of  Leonce Raphael Agbodjélou and Jack Bell Gallery. All rights reserved.

ANOTHERAFRICA.NET | TUMBLR | FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM

yagazieemezi:

Museum for African Art Scales Back Construction Plans

The new Museum for African Art, which was originally scheduled to open on New York’s Museum Mile at Fifth Avenue and 110th Street in 2009, has announced plans to dramatically scale back its construction plans in order meet budgetary shortfalls, reports the New York Times.

Once budgeted at $135 million, the project now stands to spend a more modest $95 million, and has eliminated pricey features such as a curved ceiling of rare wood imported from Ghana (it will be replaced with polished concrete), a spiraling staircase, and a classical theater and restaurant. The institution sought to sell naming rights to its new building for $50 million, but found no takers.

Keep reading

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

andrew-nunez:

Afro Taino - by Gaba LPL HD Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

andrew-nunez:

Afro Taino - by Gaba LPL HD Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

Yikes!
comicbookcovers:

The Amazing Spider-Man #26, July 1965, cover by Steve Ditko and Stan Goldberg

Yikes!

comicbookcovers:

The Amazing Spider-Man #26, July 1965, cover by Steve Ditko and Stan Goldberg